August Cheese Club: Iowa

pre-sliced-Olli-calabrese-4-ounceOlli SalumeriaCheese Club
Calabrese
Oceanside, California

A spicy salami that gets its kick from cayenne pepper and paprika. It is zesty, yet not overpowering.

WINE & CRAFT BEER PAIRING: Red Zinfandels make the perfect accompaniment to this salami. For craft beer, reach for a Belgian-style Golden Ale or a hoppy IPA to balance the spice of the salami.

WINESTYLES: Mellow or Bold
BEERSTYLES: Crisp and Clean; or Hoppy & Bitter

ABOUT OLLI SALUMERIA:
Owner, Oliviero (or Olli) grew up in a family of salumi makers. In 1850, his great grandfather was already making salami in Norcia, Italy. By 1900, his family moved to Rome, opening many salumi stores throughout a larger market.  By 1950, his grandfather started a manufacturing business, that had later grown to be the most successful salumi business in Rome. Born in Rome in 1978, Oliviero spent many years learning from his grandfather. By 2010, he moved to the United States to start his own company, Olli Salumeria, using the traditional techniques learned from his family. Learn more about their story here >


Cypress Grove humboldt fog cheeseCypress Grove
Humboldt Fog
Arcata, California

The Original American Original® was conceived in a dream, states founder Mary Keehn. Her creation opened the door for soft-ripened goat cheese in America. Each handcrafted wheel features a distinctive ribbon of edible vegetable ash. On the palate, there are flavors of buttermilk and fresh cream, complemented with floral notes, herbaceous overtones, and a clean citrus finish. As Humboldt Fog matures, the cream-line develops and the flavor intensifies.

FOOD PAIRING: Drizzle it with honey and serve with prosciutto, tart apple and Marcona almonds; or crumble it over a salad for a delicious treat. Try this recipe >

WINE & CRAFT BEER PAIRING:
Young Humboldt: Demi-sec sparkling or Sauvignon Blanc wines. IPA, Porter or Wheat craft beer.
Ripe Humboldt Fog: Pinot Grigio, Rosé, Sweet Sherry, Vouray wines or enjoy with a Pale Ale craft beer.
Mature Humboldt Fog: Pinot Noir or Zinfandel wines or IPA or Stout craft beer.

WINESTYLES: Crisp, Mellow
BEERSTYLES: Crisp and Clean or Malty and Sweet

ABOUT CYPRESS GROVE: Cypress Grove is located on the rural north coast of California. Cypress Grove founder, Mary Keehn, had a dream of a soft-ripened goat cheese that later became an award-winning, recognized cheese; this creation fueled the growth to one of the most popular creameries in the country. Learn more about her story > 


Screen Shot 2021-06-28 at 7.24.47 PMDon’t let your Wine Club go home alone!

Join our Cheese Club and bring home a match made in heaven!

If you enjoy pairing cheese with wine, this is your club!  Each month you’ll discover artisan cheeses to pair with your Wine Club. Monthly cheese selections are chosen by your local WineStyles participating location. It’s the perfect opportunity to Taste, Learn and Enjoy® amazing cheese every month! Only $19.99/month and your wine won’t be lonely!  Click to learn more >

Cheese – A Near Perfect Food

Max

Interview with Max McCalman, Dean of Curriculum and Maitre Fromager of Artisanal Cheese

What cheeses are best during the summer months?
We are coming into a pretty good time of year for cheese. It’s unfortunate that people don’t eat as much cheese in the summer, because that is when a broader type of cheeses are really starting to show. The goat’s milk cheeses in particular are at their best in summertime because the animals have more to choose from to eat. They’re also cheeses that aren’t meant to age and keep for many months.

How are goats’ milk cheeses made?
Milk is saved from four milkings—an evening milking from day one, a morning and evening milking from day two and a morning milking from day three. Goats’ milk contains coagulants, which are then sped up with the addition of cultures and rennets. When the milk has coagulated, it turns into a spongy mass—the curds. These are then cut into little pieces, which allow the whey, or liquid part, to drain off easily. The curds are then put into perforated molds, so the whey continues to drain off. The young cheese is then gently removed from the mold and set out on shelves to dry. After a couple of weeks, the cheese is dusted with vegetable ash, which makes it a little less acidic and allows for even more beneficial mold to flourish. It also takes excess moisture out and puts flavor in.

What’s a good wine/cheese pairing for summer?
Pairing principles come down to a couple of things. A salty cheese will probably pair better with a sweeter or fruitier wine. That’s why dessert wines pair so well with cheese. They give them a balancing partner. Texture comes into play, too. The harder cheeses are more successful with a broader range of wine types.

Any tips on packing cheeses for outdoor dining?
Cheese should be kept out of sunlight, but kept cool. If you are having a picnic, put it in the cooler, but don’t put it down in the ice.  Then bring it up to room temperature before eating—it will taste better. Firmer cheeses are easier to transport. A brie-type of cheese in 90-degree weather is not going to be very pretty. That should be enjoyed indoors.